From the Record Shelves #96 - Here Comes the ShowboatFrom the Record Shelves #96 – Here Comes the Showboat. I remember the time when we used answering machines. I tried to be creative and combine the message with music and I used a piece from this recording. It said “Please leave a message after the signal”, and then (…) read more and listenread more and listen

From the Record Shelves #95 - Don’t Give Me SympathyFrom the Record Shelves #95 – Don’t Give Me Sympathy. According to Edmond Hall himself, this nice little song was one that they often sang and played at home when he was small, and it stems from the 1890s. Home was in Reserve, Louisiana but Edmond (…) read more and listenread more and listen

From the Record Shelves #94 - The SwamplandFrom the Record Shelves #94 – The Swampland. I remember a quote from Willie the Lion Smith: “The musician never masters music, but learns something new every day”. I agree with that! He was himself one of “The Three” which means one of the three (…) read more and listenread more and listen

From the Record Shelves #93 - How Many TimesFrom the Record Shelves #93 – How Many Times. A compilation of more or less well known American dance bands from the 1920s. The usual way for me to use an LP like this is as background music in the morning. Like a ray of sunshine it makes me come in a good mood (…) read more and listenread more and listen

From the Record Shelves #92 - It’s the Talk of the TownFrom the Record Shelves #92 – It’s the Talk of the Town. This is a good example of how I fell in love with a recording by taping it to reel to reel tape from the radio and listen to it in certain situations in my youth. Thus, the tune, the chosen tempo and (…) read more and listenread more and listen

From the Record Shelves #91 - Move Over From the Record Shelves #91 – Move Over . When I saw this record in the shop, a department store, some day back in 1966 the price was over my budget. But I just had to have it, so I swapped etiquettes with a cheaper one. It was the only time, and I’m a bit shamed, but (…) read more and listenread more and listen

From the Record Shelves #90 - Careless LoveFrom the Record Shelves #90 – Careless Love. First I must make a bit boring comment on sound and transfers of original 78 rpm records. Once, my girlfriend wanted me to place a bid on an 78 auction because she wanted to have a Bessie Smith Record (…) read more and listenread more and listen

From the Record Shelves #89 - Brotherly LoveFrom the Record Shelves #89 – Brotherly Love. There are several good and interesting and for the most part obscure recordings on this LP. It’s difficult to make a choice of one.But here’s one from September 1926 that contains some seconds that constitutes the high point for me (…) read more and listenread more and listen

From the Record Shelves #88 - Just You, Just MeFrom the Record Shelves #88 – Just You, Just Me. Five minutes of bebop inspired jazz played in front of an enthusiastic audience in Hollywood. The clarinetist that is the centerpiece in Arnold Ross Quartet is the young swede Stan Hasselgard (Åke Hasselgård) (…) read more and listenread more and listen

From the Record Shelves #87 - The EelFrom the Record Shelves #87 – The Eel. There is a lot of good music on the LP especially among the 1933 recordings, but I simply can’t pass over Bud Freeman’s “pièce de résistance”. The title is good, if you never saw the action of the slippery creature (…) read more and listenread more and listen

From the Record Shelves #86 - Blue Blowers BluesFrom the Record Shelves #86 – Blue Blowers Blues. The LP has two contrasting orchestral sounds. On side one there is a lively washboard and kazoo group, but today I chose to put the attention to the other side with Cutis Mosby’s Blue Blowers and (…) read more and listenread more and listen

From the Record Shelves #85 - IndianaFrom the Record Shelves #85 – Indiana. When I hear this I can’t help thinking about a passus from Eddie Condon’s book We Called It Music. In a chapter called “Young Man with a Cap” it reads: “The next day we got up as the train came into Cleveland (…) read more and listenread more and listen