From the Studio #31 - It's the Talk of the TownFrom the Studio #31 – It’s the Talk of the Town – Many have sung this: Bing Crosby, Red Mc Kenzie, and Annette Hanshaw, to mention a few, who made their interpretations when the song was new in 1933. There is also a very good instrumental one from the same year by (…) read more and listenread more and listen

From the Record Shelves #257 - Everybody Loves My BabyFrom the Record Shelves #257 – Everybody Loves My Baby – I may be wrong, but I have the impression that the early recordings of the Clarence Williams Blue Five featuring Louis Armstrong and Sidney Bechet have always been a bit hard to find, especially since I started to (…) read more and listenread more and listen

From the Record Shelves #256 - Let’s MisbehaveFrom the Record Shelves #256 – Let’s Misbehave – This was the first of the “year” records that came out in the Vintage Series. I think that the year was 1967, at least that was the year I bought my copy. For me, it was an introduction to several fine dance orchestras. (…) read more and listenread more and listen

From the Studio #30 - Someday SweetheartFrom the Studio #30 – Someday Sweetheart – I don’t think that there is an end to the discussions about whether the Spike Brothers or Jelly Roll Morton are the composers of this beautiful tune. Morton and King Oliver made classic versions in the 1920’s, and we can also dream (…) read more and listenread more and listen

From the Record Shelves #255 - WhisperingFrom the Record Shelves #255 – Whispering – Paul Whiteman had a smash hit with whispering in 1920. The record features an element of novelty effect, which is a chorus of slide whistle. By 1928, it was time for a revival of the song and a modernized version. Typically (…) read more and listenread more and listen

From the Record Shelves #254 - Under a Blanket of BlueFrom the Record Shelves #254 – Under a Blanket of Blue – I recently found an LP with Connie Boswell (1907–1976) and the so-called “Original Memphis Five” with Billy Butterfield in place of Phil Napoleon. Connie was still good in the 1950s, but the music didn’t turn me on (…) read more and listenread more and listen

From the Record Shelves #253 - Get Your ManFrom the Record Shelves #253 – Get Your Man – The compilation consists of peppy melodious music played by some of the best and most interesting hot dance orchestras that the era produced. Listening through to choose one, I hoped that some tracks would stand out, but (…) read more and listenread more and listen

From the Studio #29 - Just You, Just MeFrom the Studio #29 – Just You, Just Me – The tune is from 1929, and its characteristic is that the melody of the chorus starts halfway into the first bar. There are many nice recordings, a dance band recording with Smith Ballew around 1930, and several jazz versions (…) read more and listenread more and listen

From the Record Shelves #252 - TreesFrom the Record Shelves #252 – Trees – A colorized photo and manipulated sound—I should hate this, but I don’t. This is an early LP reissue from 1959. I don’t know much about which methods they used to try to enhance the sound quality, but in this case, I think that they managed (…) read more and listenread more and listen

From the Record Shelves #251 - Tico TicoFrom the Record Shelves #251 – Tico Tico – Today I picked up a record at random, and it became this one. Xavier Cugat (1900–1990), the Spanish-American bandleader, sure had an orchestra suited to play numbers like this. The vocalist that has to sing a lot of words is (…) read more and listenread more and listen

From the Studio #28 - My Blue HeavenFrom the Studio #28 – My Blue Heaven – Here’s a tune to make people happy. It’s a good one to start or finish a concert with. Walter Donaldson composed it in 1927, and George Whiting wrote the lyrics. It can be arranged or, as in this version, just (…) read more and listenread more and listen

From the Record Shelves #250 - Ory’s Creole TromboneFrom the Record Shelves #250 – Ory’s Creole Trombone – Kid Ory recorded his composition as early as 1922 in Los Angeles and again in Chicago in 1927 with an exuberant Louis Armstrong. But this version, again from the West Coast, recorded in Hollywood in 1945 (…) read more and listenread more and listen