From the Record Shelves #168 - My Fightin’ GalFrom the Record Shelves #168 – My Fightin’ Gal – Here’s a rough blues from 1940 with Oran “Hot Lips” Page, trumpet and vocal, accompanied by a trio consisting of Leonard Feather, piano, Teddy Bunn, guitar and Ernest “Bass” Hill on bass (…) read more and listenread more and listen

From the Record Shelves #167 - YouFrom the Record Shelves #167 – You – Writings about Oliver Naylor’s Seven Aces often deal with the fact that they are unjustly unknown. And indeed, they had the capacity to play hot collective choruses like few white orchestras at this time around 1924 (…) read more and listenread more and listen

From the Record Shelves #166 - Lazy Woman's BluesFrom the Record Shelves #166 – Lazy Woman’s Blues – I used to transcribe what Louis Armstrong played and then go to our rehearsal place a few houses down the street and practice it. There is a lot to learn from those tracks; Armstrong’s choice of notes (…) read more and listenread more and listen

From the Record Shelves #165 - Moonlight Saving TimeFrom the Record Shelves #165 – Moonlight Saving Time – When I listen to Ruth Etting I try not to think about her personal life, and I don’t either want to think about the motion picture Love Me or Leave Me starring Doris Day that is based on said tragic life. No, I prefer to (…) read more and listenread more and listen

From the Record Shelves #164 - Embraceable YouFrom the Record Shelves #164 – Embraceable You – In the end of the 1930s, the commercial possibilities of the jazz music were used to great advantage. Outstanding instrumentalists with good looks and musical personality joined the big band craze and toured all over the US (…) read more and listenread more and listen

From the Record Shelves #163 - A Hundred Years from TodayFrom the Record Shelves #163 – A Hundred Years from Today – This was the second LP that I bought in my life. The year was 1965, and it has many nice songs, but this one from 1933 became a special favorite with its message about to live here and now. There are other fine versions (…) read more and listenread more and listen

From the Record Shelves #162 - LilaFrom the Record Shelves #162 – Lila – A popular song from 1928 by Maceo Pinkard who also wrote hit songs like Sugar and Sweet Georgia Brown. My interest in the song comes from another recorded version by Frankie Trumbauer’s orchestra, gilded by (…) read more and listenread more and listen

From the Record Shelves #161 - Snakes HipsFrom the Record Shelves #161 – Snakes Hips – In the 1970s, three volumes came out on LP presenting the recordings of the Georgians. At the time, very few knew about this group that recorded in New York from 1922 and on. Of course, they had nothing to do with (…) read more and listenread more and listen

From the Record Shelves #160 - Baby Won’t You Please Come HomeFrom the Record Shelves #160 – Baby Won’t You Please Come Home – I think about one of my first records, a Christmas present. It was an EP, volume two in the Jazz Museum series on Coral, then released under Frank Teschmacher’s name, but the name of (…) read more and listenread more and listen

From the Record Shelves #159 - TorneraiFrom the Record Shelves #159 – Tornerai – I brought back this box with five LPs from Paris sometime in the early 1970s. The interest in Django Reinhardt’s music has grown a lot since then. Even here in Malmö, Sweden, there is a little yearly festival (…) read more and listenread more and listen

From the Record Shelves #158 - Someday You’ll Be SorryFrom the Record Shelves #158 – Someday You’ll Be Sorry – It must be decades since I’ve listened to this album, but way back then I did it a lot. As it happens most often when you listen to something with Louis Armstrong, your foot starts going up and down (…) read more and listenread more and listen

From the Record Shelves #157 - SugarFrom the Record Shelves #157 – Sugar – In Eddie Condon’s book We Called It music (1947) it’s said, not by him but by his co-author Thomas Sugrue: “the white musicians that went to the Lincoln Gardens, the Sunset Café or the Nest knew that however (…) read more and listenread more and listen